bat course, ecology training, ecology courses

Going ‘Batty’ – spring training courses for bat workers

In February Ecology Training UK is running 3 courses that might be of interest to anyone who already has some bat experience and wants to learn even more!


3rd February – How to write an EPSL for bats (your tutor Sue Searle, has written over 70 EPSLs in her career and will share some tips and take you through the process). Devon


4th February – Getting to know the planning system – every wondered how the planning system works and what the ecologist’s role is within it? Then join us for this interesting course. Devon


10th February – Surveying trees for bats – learn all the terms and techniques for surveying trees and try out your new skills with a field visit. Devon


17th February – Bats and Developments – learn about bat mitigation techniques for various species. Devon


Go to our Courses section and book your courses there. https://ecologytraining.co.uk/book-a-course/

Smarten up for the Survey Season!

Looking for ecology jobs and want to make a good impression? Heading back to a seasonal job and want to take on more surveys and greater responsibility? Make use of the early training dates and get your extra skills in place before survey season starts.

Here are our courses in March:

Bats in Trees – 29th March in Bristol

bats in treesA great course for anyone wanting to add to their bat ecology skills and knowledge. Perfect if you are working towards your Class licence.

The course will cover bat legislation, use of trees by bats, survey methodologies, how to recognise trees used by, or potentially used by bats, and mitigation that can be used when bats are found to be present.

We will cover assessing trees from the ground and when aerial tree climbing is appropriate.

Bat Sound Analysis using Analook – 4th March – Exeter

Bats use echolocation to get around. Each species makes a slightly different call. Analysing bat calls, by looking at sonograms is a typical element of any ecologist’s work. This course gives you an introduction to one of the software packages used for this – Analook. You will need to bring a computer for the workshop element. You could follow it up with Bat Survey Data: Analysis and Presentation to learn how to present your findings in a report (5th March in Exeter).

Badger Ecology and Surveying – Date TBC near Guildford

acorn ecology badger courseBadgers are starting to emerge from their setts more regularly now, so it’s a great time to start surveying.

The course will cover urban and rural badger ecology and field signs, as well as looking at techniques used for surveying badgers.

During the course we will take a visit to an extensive badger sett where you can practice identifying field signs and mapping a sett.

It’s really easy to book courses through our website.

All our courses are taught by experienced ecologists. To find out more, meet our team.

If you have any questions about our courses, get in touch.

botany course

Time to Review

How to Become an Ecological ConsultantAt the start of this season we posted a blog about setting your goals for 2017. In fact, it’s such an important subject, we wrote two! The first blog gave you suggestions on what you could do over a summer to improve your skills. The second encouraged you to set your goals, both short term and long term, with an extract from Sue’s book – How to Become an Ecological Consultant.

But here’s the thing. Setting goals isn’t difficult. Reviewing them and measuring progress is a lot harder. So now that we’re well into November and the survey season is feeling like a distant memory, it’s time to review your goals.

 

Dig out that “to do” list. How did you get on with your short-term goals? Did you attend the training courses? Did you join those groups? Can you ID your target number of plant species?

If you did, then well done! If not, then don’t despair, you won’t be alone in this. Either way, you still need to review your plan.

Here’s how to review:

  1. Work out what did and didn’t happen on your list. Add anything you achieved that wasn’t on there (an extra training session you attended, or a last-minute conference).
  2. Look at what’s left on your list of goals and check they are still relevant. You need to be flexible. Maybe you discovered a passion for bats and you now want to become a bat specialist! Keep the central points of your plan the same, but don’t be afraid to change the details.
  3. How hard were these goals to achieve? A bit easy? Make next year more challenging. Too hard and you only managed half of them? Don’t get dispirited, make next year more achievable.
  4. What did you cover? Have you become an expert in dormice, but only learnt a dozen new plants all year? Spend some time working out why and what you can do to fix this imbalance next year. Even dormouse experts need botany!

Write up your goals for 2018. Learn from your achievements this year and go forward. Stick with the SMART method of goal setting.

S – Specificdormouse, ecology training

M – Measurable

A – Attainable

R – Relevant

T – Time-bound

Remember to set goals that are enjoyable! Have fun, keep learning and remember to review regularly to stay on track.

Sue Searle Acorn EcologyWhat could you do differently next year? Boost those skills with an Acorn Ecology course. We have introductory courses on a wide range of ecological topic, advanced courses on protected species and development and online courses too!

If you’re not sure what course is right for you, get in touch with our friendly staff on training@acornecology.co.uk, or give our Exeter office a call on 01392 366512 for some advice.

 

Diary of a Guildford placement – Kathryn

Kathryn has just finished her 4 week Certificate course work placement in the Guildford office … as you will see, she had a very busy four weeks, but finished smiling, having confirmed that this is what she wants to do! Continue reading “Diary of a Guildford placement – Kathryn”

Pipstrelle bat sound analysis

Bat Sound Analysis

What is bat sound analysis?

On every bat survey a detector is used that will record the calls of passing bats. This can be during an emergence survey, to confirm the species of the emerging bat, or during an activity survey, or very often as a static detector, which will record all bat passes over a number of nights. The data is not stored as sound files, such as you might hear through a heterodyne detector, but in a way that produce sonograms. A sonogram is a representation of a sound on a graph.

Each species produces different sounds and all look different when on a graph. Sometimes these differences are extreme, sometimes very subtle. Bat Sound Analysis is the process of looking through these data and seeing what species are on site.

Here at Acorn Ecology we use the software Analook. This is software that is used by many consultancies.

Why learn bat sound analysis?

Much of your time as a Trainee or Assistant Ecologist (and beyond) will be spent analysing sonograms of bats from your survey sites. There can be as many as 3000+ sound files recorded in one night, by one static detector. Multiply this up so that you have two or three detectors on site, for five nights at a time. Then put these out on site on a monthly basis throughout the summer and you suddenly have a LOT of sound files – and that’s just one site! Having the skill to analyse them is a real advantage in what is a very competitive job market.

What do these files look like?

Pipstrelle bat sound analysisHere’s a couple of examples: Pipistrelles at the top, and greater horseshoe below.

GHS bat sound analysis

So if you want to be able to tell your Myotis from your barbastelles, and your horseshoes from your noctules, come on the Acorn Ecology Introduction to Sound Analysis Course!

This course will teach you how to get started with Analook, one of the most common pieces of software. (The fundamentals of the course are easily transferrable to other software packages too).

The course covers:

  • How bats use sound
  • An introduction to using Analook
  • Recognising typical UK bat species sonograms
  • Produce statistics for your report
  • Practice sessions on your own laptop

Much of the course is a practical workshop. We want you to go away feeling confident in your identification skills!

We have expanded this course and we now run a second day, Bat Survey Data: Analysis and Presentation. This course will teach you how to present your data in reports and analyse how bats are using your site. It usually runs the following day from the bat sound analysis course.

Give us a call on 01392 366512 or visit www.ecologytraining.co.uk today for more information.